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Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act
Delaware Chapter 24, Title 5 Licensed Lender
Licensed by the N.J. Department of Banking and Insurance.
Licensed by the Pennsylvania Department of Banking and Insurance
Registered Mortgage Broker, NYS Banking Department, Loans Arranged with 3rd Party Lenders
Licensed by Connecticut Department of Banking
Licensed by Texas Department of Savings and Mortgage Lending
Licensed Mortgage Lender by Florida Office of Financial Regulation
Company NMLS #: 191351

Bond Street Mortgage

Mortgage Rates Newsletter - Market Analysis


Mortgage rates recovered just a bit today after hitting the highest levels in more than a month yesterday. The inspiration for much of the recent upward pressure on rates can be traced to progress in Britain's attempt to exit the European Union (aka "Brexit"). It's not that Brexit is bad for interest rates. In fact, it's definitely been a positive influence off and on for nearly 4 years now. Rather, it's the manner in which Brexit is accomplished that matters to global bond markets, and thus, to interest rates. To be clear, European markets have seen the biggest effects, but there is some spillover in the US. The most important consideration at present is whether or not the UK will leave the EU with or without a deal. A so-called "no deal" Brexit would be the better option for fans of low interest
Mortgage rates were flat today. In fact, they were very close to being flat on the week for that matter! This is a reflection of the bond markets current set of concerns, which really came into focus late last week with Thursday's Brexit-related news and Friday's trade deal updates. Brexit refers to the UK's attempts to exit the EU. As esoteric of a concern as that may seem, it's something that the bond market (and hence, interest rates) quite clearly cares about. Last Thursday's unexpected progress between Boris Johnson and Northern Ireland's Prime Minister sent rates screaming higher at their fastest pace in months. I could also argue that much of the damage that seemed to have been done by Friday's US/China trade news was instead follow-through momentum from Thursday's Brexit-inspired move
Mortgage rates didn't do much today, but risks are increasing that movement will be more brisk in the coming business days. Blame European politics--specifically: Brexit. This isn't the mortgage rates' world first go-round with the U.K.'s lengthy process of exiting the European Union (aka "Brexit"). In fact, Brexit was the single biggest factor that helped drive rates down to the long-term lows seen in 2016. For most lenders, those rates were close enough to the all-time lows seen in 2012. The fact that they were available in the middle of the summer homebuying season only made things better for the housing market. Thanks Brexit! More than 3 years later and the U.K. is set to run into yet another deadline for its divorce from the EU. This one has been on the radar for months, but it's been
Mortgage rates improved modestly today, depending on the lender. Some lenders moved rates higher yesterday due to deterioration in the bond market. Others simply planned to adjust for market conditions this morning. If we look at the last 3 days altogether, however, it's easier to characterize rates as being right in line with the highest levels in nearly a month. Volatility remains a risk in the near-term future, but not for conventional reasons. Normally, economic data and Fed policy would be responsible for the biggest moves in the bond market that underlies mortgage rates. At the moment, however, geopolitical risks and US/China trade policy updates can have an impact that's just as big. There was fresh evidence of this today when Brexit-related updates offset the influence of a key piece
Mortgage rates ended higher for the 4th straight business day on Tuesday, but that wasn't necessarily destined to be the case this morning. After last week's US/China trade announcements put upward pressure on rates heading into the 3-day weekend, some of the positivity was backtracked over the weekend. This pushed stock prices and bond yields (aka "rates") lower to start the day, but the rate recovery didn't last long. As news came in about improved odds for a Brexit deal, European bonds began losing ground quickly. This, along with a strong performance in US stock markets, put pressure on US bonds throughout the morning (pressure on bonds = higher rates). By the end of the day, most mortgage lenders had reissued rates that were closer to last Friday's . Tomorrow brings the week's only major

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