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This list is not inclusive of all states where Bond Street Mortgage, LLC may lend. Bond Street Mortgage, LLC is required to make the following disclosures by its regulatory authorities located in the applicable states. Not all states require such disclosures.
Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act
Delaware Chapter 24, Title 5 Licensed Lender
Licensed by the N.J. Department of Banking and Insurance.
Licensed by the Pennsylvania Department of Banking and Insurance
Registered Mortgage Broker, NYS Banking Department, Loans Arranged with 3rd Party Lenders
Licensed by Connecticut Department of Banking
Licensed by Texas Department of Savings and Mortgage Lending
Licensed Mortgage Lender by Florida Office of Financial Regulation
Company NMLS #: 191351

Bond Street Mortgage

Mortgage Rates Newsletter - Market Analysis


Mortgage Rates Down 0.25% This Week
At the end of last week, the average top-tier 30yr fixed mortgage rate quote was 4.375%. As of today, the exact same scenario would be at 4.125%--a quarter of a percentage point lower. That's an uncommonly big move for a single week, but it's one we've been tracking eagerly in recent days. Why is it happening? The first phase of the move had to do with the Fed's surprisingly friendly policy announcement on Wednesday. Due to the time of day that the Fed news came out, markets didn't have a chance to fully react to it until yesterday. Even so, the drop in rates was already much bigger than average. But this morning took it to the next level. In the middle of the night (in the US, anyway), economic data for Europe was released that showed a serious slowdown in German and French manufacturing.
Mortgage Rates Move Deeper Into Long-Term Lows
Granted, we're not back to the sub-4% mortgage rates that dominated much of the past 8 years, but breaking into the high 3% range is a valid consideration after the past few days. Yesterday's surprising Fed news hit the rates that were already holding near their lowest levels in well over a year. The net effect has been a decisive break lower with the average lender easily able to offer 4.375% on a typical 30yr fixed scenario. Many lenders are at 4.25%, and the interesting thing about 4.25% is that it currently doesn't cost much more to buy your way down to the next lower rate: 4.125%. All of the above has to do with the upfront prices associated with interest rates. For instance a lender is going to earn more money from a 4.375% rate than a 4.25% rate, so they're willing to pay a bit more
Mortgage Rates Surge to New Long-Term Lows After Fed
Mortgage rates broke a week-long streak of silence today following a policy announcement from the Federal Reserve. Even before today's Fed announcement, we knew we'd likely be seeing a move in rates. We just didn't know in which direction, or at what pace. As it happens, we were treated to the best case scenario on both accounts (i.e. rates moved lower at a fast pace). As we discussed yesterday, it was the Fed's balance sheet that got most of the attention from financial markets. This refers to the Fed's loan portfolio consisting of Treasuries and mortgage-backed-bonds (both forms of loans that entitle the Fed to collect interest and principal payments). As those payments came in, the Fed had previously been putting the money back into new loans (buying new bonds to replace the old ones). They
Rates Unchanged for 4th Straight Day. That Should Change Tomorrow
Mortgage rates were flat for the 4th day in a row today in a sign that investors have largely taken their seats for tomorrow's big show. The Fed will release its new policy statement at 2pm tomorrow, and while they're not expected to hike rates this time around, there are other important considerations that could have a big impact on rates. One of the considerations is the fact that March is one of the months where the Fed updates its economic projections. Investors largely tune-in to these for a glimpse at the collective rate hike outlook. This has caused big market movement in the past, but something else could be even more important tomorrow. The Fed has increasingly mentioned the impending end of its balance sheet runoff , which refers to its policy of NOT buying bonds with the money it
Mortgage Rates Hold 14-Month Lows
Mortgage rates didn't budge today--a logical result with no signs of life in underlying bond markets. In the current case, this is just fine with us considering the bond market has gone silent while remaining at the best levels in 14 months. Specifically, mortgage-backed-securities (MBS, the most important ingredient in determining mortgage rates) are at 14 month highs. When MBS are higher, rates are lower (14-month lows in this case). 10yr Treasury yields, on the other hand, spent a few hours at stronger levels on January 3rd, 2019. The only reason I bring up the modest discrepancy between Treasuries and MBS is to illustrate a point that we should keep in mind this week. Treasuries are capable of moving much more quickly than mortgage rates. That's why Treasuries made it to lower rates in

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